Main English for Everyone - Teacher's Guide

English for Everyone - Teacher's Guide

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PLEASE NOTE - this is a replica of the print book and you will need paper and a pencil to complete the exercises.

An essential teacher's companion to an innovative, uniquely visual English-language course, this e-guide helps English teachers--including those for whom English is not their native language--create clear, focused lesson plans, explain difficult concepts in a simple and concise way, and make language learning exciting, intuitive, and incredibly easy.

This teacher's e-guide is designed to accompany English for Everyone, a comprehensive course in English as a foreign language for adults. English for Everyone combines innovative and systematic visual teaching methods with the best of DK design to make the English language easy to understand and learn. Key language skills, grammar rules, and vocabulary are reinforced with listening, speaking, reading, and writing exercises, available in print and digital formats.

The English for Everyone Teacher's Guide helps busy classroom teachers or one-on-one tutors get the most out of using the course with their students. Its step-by-step guide to the crystal-clear, tightly structured teaching method shows teachers how to explain even the trickiest points of English in an engaging, easy-to-follow way. It also includes instructions for the series' highly versatile exercises, which are primarily suitable for homework, independent study, or one-on-one tutoring, but are readily adapted for classroom or group activities.

File: American Edition, true PDF

Year:
2018
Publisher:
DK, Dorling Kindersley
Language:
english
Pages:
130
ISBN 13:
9781465473899
Series:
English for Everyone
File:
PDF, 14.77 MB
Download (pdf, 14.77 MB)

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ENGLISH
FO R E V E RYO N E
TEACHER’S GUIDE

FREE AUDIO
website and app
www.dkefe.com

Author
Tom Booth worked for 10 years as an English-language teacher in Poland
and Russia. He now lives in England, where he works as an editor and
English-language materials writer. He has contributed to a number
of books in the English for Everyone series.

Contributing authors to the series
Victoria Boobyer is a freelance writer and teacher trainer with a background
in English-language teaching and teacher management.
Trish Burrow has worked as a teacher, a teacher trainer, and an
ELT lecturer. She is a freelance writer and editor.
Rachel Harding is an author of English-language learning materials
and has written for major English-language publishers.
Claire Hart is a freelance author. She teaches English at the University
of Applied Sciences in Neu-Ulm, Germany.
Gill Johnson runs a large modern languages department
at an international school in Sussex, UK.
Barbara MacKay has written for major English-language publishers including
Oxford University Press and Macmillan Education.

Course consultant
Tim Bowen has taught English and trained teachers in more than
30 countries worldwide. He is the co-author of works on pronunciation teaching
and language-teaching methodology, and author of numerous books for
English-language teachers. He is currently a freelance materials writer, editor, and
translator. He is a member of the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

Language consultant
Professor Susan Barduhn is an experienced English-language teacher, teacher
trainer, and author. She has been President of the International Association of
Teachers of English as a Foreign Language, and an adviser
to the British Council and the US State Department. She is currently a Professor
at the School for International Training in Vermont.

FO R E V E RYO N E
TEACHER’S GUIDE

US Editor Jenny Wilson
Editors Tom Booth, Laura Sandford
Art Editor Dominic Clifford
Illustrator Edwood Burn
Project Manager Christine Stroyan
Jacket Designer Surabhi ; Wadhwa
Jacket Editor Claire Gell
Jacket Design Development Manager Sophia MTT
Producer, Pre-Production Jacqueline Street-Elkayam
Senior Producer Alex Bell
Publisher Andrew Macintyre
Art Director Karen Self
Publishing Director Jonathan Metcalf
DK India
Art Editor Debjyoti Mukherjee
Senior Art Editor Viabhav Rastogi
Jacket Designer Tanya Mehrotra
Jackets Editorial Coordinator Priyanka Sharma
Managing Jackets Editor Saloni Singh
Pre-production Manager Balwant Singh
Senior DTP Designers Vishal Bhatia, Rakesh Kumar
Managing Art Editor Sudakshina Basu

How to use
this book
Finding the exercises
The English for Everyone course books and practice books
contain more than 40 different types of exercises. This
Teacher’s Guide provides advice and activities for each of
these exercise types, and has been designed so that you
can quickly find the type of exercise that you want to use
with your students. The book is divided into five sections
(grammar, vocabulary, reading, listening, and speaking)
and opens with a visual contents list. This includes a small
image of each exercise type
to help you locate the same
type of exercise as the one
you are teaching.

First American Edition, 2018
Published in the United States by DK Publishing
345 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014
Copyright © 2018 Dorling Kindersley Limited
DK, a Division of Penguin Random House LLC
18 19 20 21 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
001–309738–Jun/2018
All rights reserved.
Without limiting the rights under the copyright reserved above, no
part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced
into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means
(electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise),
without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.
Published in Great Britain by Dorling Kindersley Limited.
A catalog record for this book
is available from the Library of Congress.
ISBN 978-1-4654-7389-9
DK books are available at special discounts when purchased
in bulk for sales promotions, premiums, fund-raising, or
educational use. For details, contact: DK Publishing Special
Markets, 345 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014
SpecialSales@dk.com
Printed in China
All images © Dorling Kindersley Limited
For further information see: www.dkimages.com

A WORLD OF IDEAS:
SEE ALL THERE IS TO KNOW
www.dk.com

In the classroom
The activities and advice pages in the Teacher’s Guide offer
clear and practical support that will help you to give
focused lessons and explain difficult concepts. Each page
is dedicated to a particular exercise type and includes
one or two examples of the exercise, and between four
and six activities to use in your lesson. These activities
include group work, role plays, and written assignments,
and make full use of the audio transcripts that feature at the
back of the book.

Contents at a glance
The Teacher’s Guide is divided into five sections, each of them dealing with
a language skill. A more detailed look at the different types of exercise within
each section can be found on pages 6–9.

6

A detailed guide to the exercise types

10

About English for Everyone

GRAMMAR
20
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

General teaching advice
Choosing the correct word or sentence
Correcting errors
Filling in the gaps
Filling in the gaps with tenses
Putting words in the correct order
Writing a sentence another way
Sorting words into categories
Matching beginnings and endings of sentences
Understanding target grammar
Choosing the best sentence
Everyday English
Business English

VOCABULARY
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

General teaching advice
Writing the correct word for a picture
Writing the correct expression
Matching words or sentences to pictures
Choosing the correct word or sentence
Matching words and definitions
Filling in the gaps
Sorting words into categories
Correcting errors
Matching halves of sentences
Matching words to their opposites
Vocabulary puzzles
Finding target vocabulary in a text

READING
47
48
49
50
51

General teaching advice
Choosing the correct answer to a question
Answering questions as full sentences
Putting pictures or sentences in order
Marking the correct summary of a text

LISTENING
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59

General teaching advice
Choosing the correct answer to a question
Answering questions as full sentences
Putting pictures or sentences in order
Marking the correct summary
Listening for target language
Listening for stress or intonation
Taking notes

SPEAKING
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68

General teaching advice
Speaking correct English out loud
Using a chart to create sentences
Describing a picture
Describing an infographic
Answering questions on a passage of text
Responding out loud to audio
Pronunciation and intonation exercises
Emphasizing the correct word

69

Transcripts of listening exercises

Contents A detailed guide to the exercise types
GRAMMAR
REWRITE THE INDIRECT QUESTIONS, PUTTING THE WORDS
IN THE CORRECT ORDER

MARK THE SENTENCES THAT ARE CORRECT

22

Choosing the correct word
or sentence

26

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, CORRECTING THE ERRORS

MARK WHETHER EACH SENTENCE IS A PREDICTION, OFFER,
PROMISE, OR DECISION

Putting words in the correct order

30

Prediction

Offer

Promise

Decision

Prediction

Offer

Promise

Decision

Prediction

Offer

Promise

Decision

Understanding target grammar

FILL IN THE GAPS, PUTTING THE
WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, REVERSING THE ORDER OF THE PHRASES

All of these replies are correct, but some are more
appropriate for formal or informal situations.

23

Correcting errors

27

FILL IN THE GAPS USING
THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

WRITE THE WORDS FROM THE PANEL UNDER THE CORRECT GROUPS

OPINION

24

Filling in the gaps

28

FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE
VERBS IN THE PRESENT PERFECT

25

6

Filling in the gaps with tenses

31 Choosing the best sentence

Writing a sentence another way

SIZE

SHAPE

AGE

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

COLOR

Sorting words into categories

32

MATCH THE BEGINNINGS OF THE SENTENCES TO THE CORRECT ENDINGS

29

Matching beginnings
and endings of sentences

Everyday English

MARK THE SENTENCES THAT
ARE CORRECT

33

Business English

VOCABULARY
FOOD AND DRINK WRITE THE WORDS FROM THE PANEL UNDER
THE CORRECT PICTURES

35

Writing the correct word
for a picture

39

Writing the correct expression

Matching words and definitions

43

40 Filling in the gaps

MATCH THE PICTURES TO
THE CORRECT SENTENCES

Matching halves of sentences

MATCH THE FEELINGS
TO THEIR OPPOSITES

FILL IN THE GAPS TO COMPLETE
THE SENTENCES

FAMILY AND RELATIONSHIPS WRITE THE PHRASES FROM
THE PANEL UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

36

MATCH THE BEGINNINGS OF THE SENTENCES TO THE CORRECT
ENDINGS

MATCH THE DEFINITIONS TO THE WORDS AND PHRASES

44 Matching words to their opposites

READ THE CLUES AND WRITE THE ANSWERS IN
THE GRID

WRITE THE WORDS FROM THE
PANEL IN THE CORRECT GROUPS

POSITIVE

NEGATIVE

37

Matching words or sentences
and pictures

41

Choosing the correct word
or sentence

45

READ THE POSTCARD AND CORRECT THE INCORRECTLY SPELLED WORDS

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT ADJECTIVE IN EACH SENTENCE

38

Sorting words into categories

42

Correcting errors

Vocabulary puzzles

READ THE PASSAGE AND
WRITE THE HIGHLIGHTED WORDS
NEXT TO THEIR DEFINITIONS

46

Finding target vocabulary in a text

7

READING

LISTENING

READ THE POSTCARD AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MATCH THE IMAGES TO THE PHRASES

Zac has been offered a job in New York.
He asks his friend Leah for advice.

48

Choosing the correct answer
to a question

53

READ THE ARTICLE AND WRITE ANSWERS TO THE QUESTIONS AS
FULL SENTENCES

Choosing the correct answer
to a question

57

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND WRITE ANSWERS TO THE QUESTIONS IN
FULL SENTENCES

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK
THE STRESSED SYLLABLES

A radio station is reporting
on aging populations.

49

Answering questions
as full sentences

54

READ THE ARTICLE AND NUMBER THE PICTURES IN THE ORDER
THEY HAPPENED

50

Putting pictures or sentences
in order

Answering questions
as full sentences

READ THE REPORT AND MARK
THE CORRECT SUMMARY

Putting pictures or sentences
in order
LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK THE CORRECT SUMMARY
A radio host is talking about the unsolved
mystery of the SS Ourang Medan.

51

8

Marking the correct summary
of a text

58 Listening for stress or intonation

LISTEN TO THE LECTURE AND CHOOSE THE BEST SUMMARY NOTES

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO, THEN NUMBER THE IMAGES IN THE ORDER
THEY ARE DESCRIBED

55

56

Marking the correct summary

Listening for target language

59

Taking notes

WRITING

SPEAKING
READ THE EMAIL THEN ANSWER THE QUESTIONS,
SPEAKING OUT LOUD

CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORD IN EACH SENTENCE, THEN SAY
THE SENTENCES OUT LOUD

61

Speaking correct English out loud

65

USE THE CHART TO CREATE 12 CORRECT SENTENCES AND SAY THEM
OUT LOUD

Start with
one of these
determiners.

62

Choose the singular
or plural of “to be”
to match.

Choose a
determiner
or name.

Answering questions on a
passage of text
LOOK AT THE POSTER, THEN RESPOND TO THE AUDIO,
SPEAKING OUT LOUD

66

Responding out loud to audio

DESCRIBE THE NEWS OUT LOUD USING PASSIVE REPORTING LANGUAGE

MARK THE SILENT LETTERS AND SAY THE
SENTENCE OUT LOUD

63

Describing a picture

USE “WHEN” AND “WHILE” TO DESCRIBE EVENTS ON THE
TIMELINE, SPEAKING OUT LOUD

64 Describing an infographic

Other exercises can be adapted to include
a writing element. You can ask your
students to write true or false sentences
about themselves using the target
grammar, to write a summary based on
the listening or reading activities, or to
write a presentation based on the topic of
the lesson. Other ideas for writing
activities include the following:

▪ Ask your students to fill in an
application form, questionnaire, or
complete a quiz. You can find examples
of these in magazines or online.

Finish with one
of these nouns.

Using a chart to create sentences

Many of the exercises in English for
Everyone include a writing element. Your
students will sometimes have to form
sentences using correct grammar or
relevant vocabulary. They will sometimes
have to respond to questions about a text
or piece of audio with a full sentence.

67

Pronunciation and
intonation exercises

▪ Use examples of charts, graphs, and
other information from newspapers or
magazines. Your students can write a
report using the information.
▪ Your students can write their own
emails replying to the emails in reading
comprehension exercises.
▪ Encourage your students to keep a blog
in English. This can be an ongoing activity
during the course, and they can print out
and share extracts with their classmates.

UNDERLINE THE WORDS YOU NEED TO STRESS AND SAY EACH
SENTENCE OUT LOUD

68 Emphasizing the correct word

9

About English for Everyone
English for Everyone is a comprehensive language course that is suitable for
students of all levels who want to learn English. Its engaging, easy-to-follow style
of presentation makes it ideal for both classroom teaching and homework tasks.

Overview of the general course
The four graded levels in the general English course are suitable for
students at beginner, intermediate, and advanced level. Each level
consists of a course book and an accompanying practice book.
BEGINNER

BEGINNER

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCED

Course book
ISBN 978-1-4654-4762-3 US$17.95
Practice book
ISBN 978-1-4654-4866-8 US$12.95

Course book
ISBN 978-1-4654-5183-5 US$17.95
Practice book
ISBN 978-1-4654-5184-2 US$12.95

Course book
ISBN 978-1-4654-4763-0 US$19.95
Practice book
ISBN 978-1-4654-4868-2 US$14.95

Course book
ISBN 978-1-4654-4835-4 US$19.95
Practice book
ISBN 978-1-4654-4867-5 US$14.95

Level 1 Beginner is suitable
for students who are just
starting to learn English,
as well as those learners
who already have a little
English knowledge.

Level 2 Beginner is suitable
for students who have
learned the basics of English,
but who need to develop
their skills in order to use
English independently.

Level 3 Intermediate is
suitable for learners who
already have a solid
foundation in English and
are ready to improve their
knowledge and fluency.

Level 4 Advanced is for
those students who already
have a good language
ability and are ready to
expand their vocabulary,
grammar, and fluency.

Language levels

The English for Everyone course is aligned to the CEFR, the international
standard for language learning. The table below compares the CEFR
levels with the exam scores for the most popular international exams.
BEGINNER

CEFR

10

BEGINNER

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCED

A1

A2

B1–lower B2

upper B2–C1

TOEFL paper-based test

0–250

250–340

340–520

520–580

TOEFL

0–30

30–60

60–200

200–240

TOEFL internet test

0–10

10–20

20–70

70–95

IELTS

0–2.5

2.5–3.5

3.5–5.5

5.5–7

TOEIC

0–200

200–500

500–850

850–900

English for Everyone Business English
English for Everyone Business English is aimed at students who want to develop their
English skills for use in business and at work. It focuses primarily on the language and
vocabulary most relevant to business. There are two graded levels, each consisting
of a course book and an accompanying practice book.

Language levels

LEVEL

LEVEL

The course is divided into two levels, which
are broadly aligned to the CEFR. The table
below compares the levels of the two
books with the approximate equivalent
exam scores.
LEVEL

Level 1 is suitable for students
who know the basics of English,
but want to develop language
skills that can be used in various
workplace scenarios.

Level 2 is suitable for learners
who have a solid foundation
in English, but want to expand
their grammar and fluency for
use in a business environment.

LEVEL

CEFR

A2–lower B1

B1–lower B2

IELTS

2.5–3.5

3.5–5.5

TOEIC

200–500

500–850

BEC

Preliminary

Vantage

LCCI

Level 1

Level 2

0–39

40–59

BULATS

Also available as one volume
Course book: ISBN 978-1-4654-4921-4 US$29.95 Practice book: ISBN 978-1-4654-5268-9 US$19.95

English Grammar Guide

English Vocabulary Builder

This comprehensive visual guide to English
grammar contains clear, simple explanations
and can be used by teachers, as well as
students of all levels.

More than 3,000 of the most useful English
words and phrases are presented in this
beautifully illustrated reference book that
is suitable for students of all levels.

English Grammar
Guide uses the same
visual learning method
as the other books in the
English for Everyone
series. It is suitable for all
students, from beginner
to advanced, and can be
used as a practical
reference book for
teachers when preparing
grammar lessons.
ISBN 978-1-4654-5154-5
US$24.95

English Vocabulary
Builder is both an
illustrated vocabulary
reference and a practical
workbook. Audio
recordings for each
word or phrase are
available online, and
all the vocabulary is
thoroughly tested in
the practice exercises.
ISBN 978-1-4654-6483-5
US$24.95

11

How the course books work
Each English for Everyone course book covers all the core skills: grammar,
vocabulary, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It teaches
these skills as visually as possible, using images and graphics to help your
students understand and remember what they have learned.

Structure of the units

Practice modules New
language is thoroughly tested
in each pratice module.

Unit number The book is divided
into units. The unit number helps
students keep track of their progress.

Each unit opens with teaching
modules that are followed by
exercises in which your students
can practice their new skills.

Future arrangements
You can use the present continuous to talk about
things that are happening now. You can also use it
to talk about arrangements for the future.

FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE VERBS IN THE PRESENT CONTINUOUS

New language Future with present continuous
Vocabulary Excuses
New skill Talking about future arrangements

KEY LANGUAGE PRESENT CONTINUOUS WITH FUTURE EVENTS
Use time phrases
to show whether a
verb in the present
continuous refers
to the present
or the future.

Grammar teaching module New
grammar is clearly presented at the
start of most units.

“At the moment”
refers to the present.

Time clause “tomorrow”
refers to the future.

Present continuous refers to
Dave’s present activity.

Present continuous
refers to a future event
that is planned.

FURTHER EXAMPLES PRESENT CONTINUOUS WITH FUTURE EVENTS

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO, THEN NUMBER THE PICTURES
IN THE ORDER YOU HEAR THEM

Audio support Most modules have
supporting audio recordings to help students
improve their speaking and listening skills.

You can use the time word or phrase
at the start or end of a clause.

KEY LANGUAGE “ON / IN” WITH DAYS, MONTHS, AND DATES
Use the preposition “on” in front of days of the week and
specific dates. Use “in” with months and years.

Exercises Modules with white backgrounds
contain exercises that help your students
practice their new skills to reinforce learning.

Grammar teaching modules
New language is presented in easy-to-understand stages, starting with a simple explanation,
followed by further examples and a breakdown of how the structure is formed.
PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

The past activity
often affects the
present moment.

Sample sentence New language is introduced in context, with
colored highlights to help students identify new constructions.

Visuals Pictures and infographics will help you to explain
even the most complicated grammar to your students.

SUBJECT + VERB

Further examples New grammar is presented in different
contexts to help students see how English is used in real life.

12

“MORE”

ADJECTIVE

“THAN”

REST OF SENTENCE

Formation guides Visual guides show your students
how to form even complex sentences.

Vocabulary teaching modules
The English for Everyone course books regularly include vocabulary modules that list
the most useful English words and phrases. At higher levels, students are presented with
the idiomatic expressions they might encounter when dealing with native speakers.

Vocabulary

Illustrations Crystal-clear
illustrations help your
students to remember
new vocabulary.

TECHNOLOGY AND THE FUTURE

Sample sentence Idiomatic
expressions are presented
in a sentence to help your
students understand them.

Vocabulary

Definitions A simple
explanation helps students
to understand higherlevel expressions.

FOOD AND DRINK

Dotted lines Students
can write a translation
in their own language
below each illustration.

Audio symbol All the vocabulary on these
pages is available as audio recordings.

Practice exercises
The teaching modules are followed by
carefully graded exercises that will help
your students to fix new language in their
memory. Each exercise is introduced with
a symbol to help you and your students
identify which skill is being practiced.

Grammar icon This symbol
indicates that students are being
tested on a grammar point.

Grammar
Your students have to
apply new language rules
in different contexts.

Vocabulary
Your students have the
chance to practice
key vocabulary.

Reading
Your students are presented
with target language in
real-life English contexts.

Speaking
Your students compare
their spoken English to
model audio recordings.

Listening
Your students are tested
on their understanding
of spoken English.

READ THE CLUES AND WRITE THE ANSWERS IN THE GRID

Sample answer The first
question of each exercise is
answered, to make the task easier
for students to understand.
Write-on lines Most exercises
include a space where students
can write their answers.

Illustrations Visual cues help
students understand the exercises.
Audio symbol Students can
listen to the answers after
completing the exercise.

13

Audio

FREE AUDIO
website and app
www.dkefe.com

The English for Everyone course includes almost
40-hours of supporting audio materials featuring
native UK- and US-English speakers. You can register
at www.dkefe.com to access the audio for free.
This symbol denotes a listening comprehension
exercise. Students should listen to an audio
track and answer questions on it.
This symbol indicates that extra audio
material is available for your students to use.
The extra material includes:
▪ Recordings of all the sample sentences,
including further examples, in the grammar
teaching boxes.
▪ Recordings of the vocabulary taught
in featured vocabulary spreads and
teaching boxes.
▪ Recordings of correct or model answers
to the majority of the exercises, including
all the speaking exercises.

Online audio
Students click
on a separate
box to hear
each question
in the listening
exercise.

Vocabulary
Students can
hear each item
of vocabulary
read by a native
English speaker.

Transcripts

The Teacher’s Guide includes the
audio transcripts for the whole
English for Everyone series (see
pp 70–128). Your students can
use them to familiarize
themselves with new vocabulary
and target grammar. Teachers
can adapt them for use in
activities in the classroom.

Transcripts of listening exercises
English for Everyone features almost 40 hours of high-quality supporting audio from native English speakers.
The audio includes sample sentences, words, and phrases from teaching modules, correct answers for most of
the exercises, and material for listening comprehension exercises. The transcripts below are of the audio for the
listening comprehension exercises in the course and practice books, including the Business English audio.

Levels
The transcripts
follow the same
order as the course
books and pratice
books in the English
for Everyone series.

Units
The transcripts are
organized according
to the unit in which
they appear.

14

UNIT 5

LEVEL 1

BEGINNER COURSE BOOK
UNIT 1

1.5.1 Hi. I’m Katherine.
1.5.2 Hello. My name’s Joseph. Some people
call me Joe.
1.5.3 Hi. I’m Ruby.
1.5.4 My name’s Oliver, or Oli for short.
1.5.5 My name’s Charlotte, but my friends
call me Charlie.
1.5.6 I’m Elliot.
1.9 ex: My name’s Jack Lord. That’s Jack…
J-A-C-K… Lord… L-O-R-D.
1.9.1 My name’s Belinda. That’s B-E-L-I-N-D-A.
1.9.2 F: What’s your name?
M: Lewis.
F: How do you spell that?
M: L-E-W-I-S.
1.9.3 F: My name’s Jessica Adams.
M: How do you spell your last name?
F: It’s A-D-A-M-S.
1.9.4 My name’s Bob. That’s B-O-B.
1.9.5 F: My name’s Alice Spencer.
M: How do you spell your last name?
F: It’s S-P-E-N-C-E-R.
1.9.6 F: My name’s Kate Wallace.
M: How do you spell that?
F: It’s Kate… K-A-T-E… Wallace…
W-A-L-L-A-C-E.
1.9.7 I’m Saul Jackson. That’s Saul… S-A-U-L
and Jackson… J-A-C-K-S-O-N.
1.9.8 M: What’s your full name?
F: It’s Natalie Lau.
M: How do you spell that?
F: Natalie… N-A-T-A-L-I-E… Lau… L-A-U.
1.9.9 I’m Chris Boyle. That’s C-H-R-I-S

B-O-Y-L-E.

UNIT 3

3.8 ex: My name’s Tamar and I’m 50 years old.
3.8.1 I’m Bobby and I’m 40.
3.8.2 My brother’s called Carl and he’s 30.
3.8.3 Lia is 19 years old.
3.8.4 My name’s Sam and I’m 60.
3.8.5 My grandma is called Molly and she’s 80.
3.8.6 Hi, I’m Justin and I’m 17.
3.8.7 I have a daughter called Ada. She’s 13.

5.10.1 This is my cat. Her name’s Priscilla and she’s
five years old.
5.10.2 That is our dog. His name’s Rex and he’s
a labrador.
5.10.3 This is our parrot. His name’s Boris and he
speaks English.
5.10.4 That snake in the zoo comes from Mexico.
It’s a python and its name is Luis.
5.10.5 That is Blaze, our horse. She lives in
our field.

UNIT 6

6.4 F: Look at these. Are they Ben’s photos?
M: Yes, they’re photos of his family.
F: Who’s this? I don’t know her.
M: It’s Edith. She’s Ben’s grandmother.
F: Oh, and this is Ben’s father?
M: Yes, that’s right. It’s Lucas.
F: Here’s Lily. I know her.
M: Oh, Ben’s mother. Yes, that’s a good photo of her.
F: And this is Noah.
M: He’s Ben’s son. He’s 14 now.
F: Wow.
M: Here’s a photo of Grace.
F: Ben’s sister. You’re right.
M: They’re great photos. Oh, and here’s an old
picture of Alex.
F: Isn’t he Ben’s brother?
M: Yes. He looks very young in the photo.

UNIT 8

8.10 Sarah: Hurry up, Tom. We’re late for work.
Tom: Oh, all right. Let’s get our things.
Sarah: So this purse is mine, but these sandwiches
are yours.
Tom: Yeah, they’re my lunch. And this is my
cell phone.
Sarah: OK. And your ID card is here, too.
Tom: These are your books.
Sarah: Oh yes… and this is your chocolate bar…
Tom: …and that brush is yours…
Sarah: …and this is my notebook. Great. Well, I
think that’s it. Have a nice day.
Tom: You, too. See you later.

UNIT 10

10.9.1 I’m Levi and I work outside all day. I work on
construction sites, building houses.
10.9.2 I’m Violet and I work in the kitchen of a busy
restaurant. I cook the food and I work with waiters
and waitresses.

10.9.3 My name’s Tina and I’m 23 years old. I work
outside on a farm. I work with animals every day.
10.9.4 My name’s Diego and I work in a school.
I teach children English and music.
10.9.5 My name’s Theo and I work in a hospital.
I work with nurses and I see patients every day.
10.9.6 I’m Isabella and I work outside in gardens
every day. I work with plants and trees. It’s a great
job. I love working outside.
10.13 F: Hi, Noah. How are you?
Noah: I’m well, thanks. I’ve got a new job. I’m a
mechanic in the new garage in town.
F: Wow, that’s great news.
Noah: Yes… and my sister is still a nurse at the
hospital. She works with patients there.
F: What about your brother?
Noah: He’s a scientist. He works in a laboratory
in the city.
F: That’s interesting.
Noah: I know. And my mother works from home.
She’s an artist. She’s really good!
F: And what about your dad?
Noah: He’s a farmer. He works on our farm.
F: With lots of animals?
Noah: Yes. He works with cows and sheep every
day. It’s a tiring job.

UNIT 11

11.4 ex: M: What time is it, please?
F: It’s a quarter to six. It’s five forty-five.
11.4.1 M: Excuse me. What time is it?
F: It’s half past eleven. It’s eleven thirty.
11.4.2 F: Excuse me. What’s the time, please?
M: It’s seven o’clock. It’s seven.
11.4.3 M: What’s the time?
F: It’s a quarter past four. It’s four fifteen.
11.4.4 F1: Excuse me. What is the time?
F2: It’s half past nine. It’s nine thirty.
11.4.5 F: What’s the time, please?
M: It’s a quarter past two. It’s two fifteen.

UNIT 13

13.12 M: So, what time do you start work, Joan?
Joan: 4am.
M: 4am? You start work at 4 o’clock in the morning?
Joan: Yes.
M: Wow!
Joan: Yes, but I finish work at noon.
M: OK. That’s better.
Joan: Yes. I go home and eat lunch at 1pm, and
then I take it easy.

How the practice books work
The English for Everyone practice books are packed with exercises designed to
reinforce the lessons you have taught from the course books. The exercises can
be used as homework tasks throughout the course, or in the classroom when
reviewing language points you have already taught.

How the practice books complement the course books
Each unit in a practice book corresponds to the
equivalent unit in the course book, reinforcing the
same language points, vocabulary, and skills.
Asking about the past
New language Past simple questions
Vocabulary Travel and activities
New skill Talking about vacations

You can make questions in the past simple using
“did.” This is useful for asking about past events,
such as travel and vacations.

Each practice book unit uses
the same color scheme as the
corresponding course book unit.
Asking about the past

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO, THEN NUMBER THE PICTURES IN THE
ORDER THEY ARE DESCRIBED
Bea talks about her vacation in India.

You can make questions in the past simple using
“did.” This is useful for asking about past events,
such as travel and vacations.

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS IN THE
CORRECT ORDER

KEY LANGUAGE “YES / NO” QUESTIONS IN THE PAST SIMPLE
Use the auxiliary verb
“did” to make questions
in the past simple that
have “yes/no” answers.

“Did” goes before the subject.

The verb after
“did” goes in its
base form.

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND MARK WHETHER EACH THING
DID OR DIDN’T HAPPEN

New language Past simple questions
Vocabulary Travel and activities
New skill Talking about vacations

Use “did” or “didn’t”
for short answers.

FURTHER EXAMPLES “YES / NO” QUESTIONS IN THE PAST SIMPLE

MATCH THE QUESTIONS
TO THE SHORT ANSWERS

REWRITE THE SENTENCES
AS QUESTIONS
REWRITE THE SENTENCES AS QUESTIONS

“Did” doesn’t
change with
the subject.

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AGAIN AND ANSWER THE QUESTIONS
WITH SHORT ANSWERS

HOW TO FORM “YES / NO” QUESTIONS IN THE PAST SIMPLE
“DID”

SUBJECT

VERB

OBJECT

COURSE BOOK

Structure of the units
Each practice book unit
is structured so that
the exercises follow
a similar order to those
in the corresponding
course book unit.

PRACTICE BOOK

Unit number The book is divided
into units. The unit number helps
students keep track of their progress.

Activities in progress
Practice points
Every unit begins
with a summary
of the key
practice points.

Use the present perfect continuous to talk about
ongoing activities in the past. Use “for” and “since” to
talk about the length or starting point of an activity.

Heading Each unit deals
with the same topic as
the course book.
READ THE EMAIL AND NUMBER THE PICTURES IN THE
ORDER THEY ARE DESCRIBED

New language Present perfect continuous
Vocabulary Home improvements
New skill Talking about activities in the past

FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE VERBS IN THE PRESENT PERFECT
CONTINUOUS TENSE

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND WRITE HOW LONG EACH ACTIVITY
HAS BEEN GOING ON

Modules The units are
broken down into
modules, which students
should do in order.

FILL IN THE GAPS USING “FOR” OR “SINCE”

Audio The answers to the exercise are
available as audio tracks, so that your
students can check their answers.

15

Practice vocabulary exercises
The English for Everyone practice books test and reinforce at regular intervals all
the vocabulary your class has studied in the course books. The exercises can be
used in the classroom or at home, where your students can check their answers
using the supporting audio available on the website and app.
Illustrations The same
visual cues are used in the
practice books as in the
course books.

Word panel Your students
have to choose the correct
word for each picture from
the word panel.

Vocabulary
ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS WRITE THE PHRASES
FROM THE PANEL UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

EVERYDAY THINGS WRITE THE WORDS FROM THE PANEL
UNDER THE CORRECT PICTURES

Definitions Higher-level
students have to match
phrases and definitions.

Phrases in word panel
Your students should write
the correct phrase under its
definition.

Practice exercises
The exercises in the practice books
correspond closely to those in the course
books and further reinforce the grammar,
skills, and vocabulary that you have been
teaching. Each exercise uses the same
symbol as in the course books to indicate
the skill that is being practiced.

Grammar icon This
symbol indicates that
students are being tested
on a grammar point.

Write-on lines Most
exercises include a space
where students can write
their answers.

16

Grammar
Your students have to
apply new language rules
in different contexts.

Vocabulary
Your students have the
chance to practice
key vocabulary.

Reading
Your students are presented
with target language in
real-life English contexts.

Speaking
Your students compare
their spoken English to
model audio recordings.

Listening
Your students are tested
on their understanding
of spoken English.

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, PUTTING THE WORDS
IN THE CORRECT ORDER

Sample answer The
first question of each
exercise is answered, to
make the task easier for
students to understand.
Audio symbol
Students can listen
to the answers after
completing the exercise.

Online practice exercises
The exercises from all the practice books in the English for Everyone series are also
available to purchase in interactive digital formats. They are easy to use and compatible
with most devices. They are available online and as an app for iOS and Android.

Audio After choosing
their answer, your students
can play the audio and hear
the correct version.

COMPUTER

TABLET

PHONE

Track your students’ progress
The course is designed to make it easy to monitor your students’
progress, with regular summary and review modules. Answers are
provided for every exercise, so you can see how well your
students have understood each teaching point.

Answers Find the
answers to every
exercise printed at
the back of the book.

Checklists Every unit ends with a
checklist, where your students can check
off the new skills they have learned.
CHECKLIST
“These” and “those”

Possessions

Using determiners and pronouns

Review modules At the end of a group
of units, you will find a more detailed
review module, summarizing the
language your students have learned.

Answers

Check boxes Your students
can use these boxes to mark
the skills they feel comfortable
with. They should go back and
review anything they feel they
need to practice further.

Exercise numbers
Match these numbers
to the unique identifier
at the top-left corner
of each exercise.

REVIEW THE ENGLISH YOU HAVE LEARNED IN UNITS 01–08
NEW LANGUAGE

SAMPLE SENTENCE

UNIT

INTRODUCING YOURSELF

HOW OLD ARE YOU?

POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVES

APOSTROPHE WITH “S”

“THIS,” “THAT,”
“THESE,” AND “THOSE”

DETERMINERS AND PRONOUNS

Audio This symbol
indicates that the
answers can also
be listened to.

17

Other English for Everyone titles
The English for Everyone series also includes the English Grammar Guide
and English Vocabulary Builder. Both books provide indispensable
support for teachers and students of English at all levels.

How the English
Grammar Guide works
The present continuous
The present continuous is used to talk about continued
actions that are happening in the present moment.
It is formed with “be” and a present participle.

R12

PRESENT PARTICIPLE SPELLING RULES

Last letter
is an “-e.”

Last letters
are “-ie.”

TENSE
Last letters are consonant–vowel–consonant
and the final syllable is stressed.

The present continuous
uses the verb “be.”

CONTRACTIONS

PRONOUN

“BE”

“WILL”

“WOULD”

“HAVE”

“HAD”

Present continuous
Past simple with “be”

This is the present simple. It describes
a repeated action or situation.

Past simple with other verbs
Add “-ing” to form
regular present participles.

Leave out “e.”

Change
“-ie” to “y.”

Double the last
letter, unless it’s
“w,” “x,” or “y.”

This is the present continuous. It describes
what is happening right now.

HOW TO FORM
VERB + “-ING”

Past continuous
Present perfect simple
Present perfect continuous

TIP

Present participles
follow the same
spelling rules
as gerunds.

Don’t double the last letter because
the final syllable is not stressed.

“AM / IS / ARE”

NEGATIVE STATEMENT

Present simple with other verbs

FURTHER EXAMPLES

SUBJECT

POSITIVE STATEMENT

Present simple with “be”

THE PRESENT CONTINUOUS
The present continuous is
used to describe a current,
continued action.

R13

FORMING NEGATIVES

The present participle is formed by adding “-ing” to the base form
of the verb. Some participles have slightly different spelling rules.

See also:
Present simple 1 Action and state verbs 50
Infinitives and participles 51

Past perfect simple
Past perfect continuous
Future with “going to”

REST OF SENTENCE

VERB AND “NOT”

CONTRACTION

MODAL VERB AND “HAVE”

CONTRACTION

Future with “will”
Future continuous
Future perfect simple
Future perfect continuous

Present participle

FURTHER EXAMPLES

The subject and the verb
can be contracted.

MODAL VERB

ACTION

POSITIVE STATEMENT

COMMON MISTAKES CONTRACTIONS

NEGATIVE STATEMENT

These contractions are often spelled incorrectly
because they look and sound very similar to other
words. Contracted forms always use an apostrophe.

“Can”

COMMON MISTAKES STATE VERBS IN CONTINUOUS TENSES

“Could”

Action verbs can be used in simple and continuous forms.
State verbs are not usually used in continuous forms.

“Should”
“Might”

STATE

“Must”

Language learning
Each grammar point
uses colors and visuals
to illustrate how it works.

Further examples
Grammar is shown
being used in a number
of different contexts.

Reference
The reference section at the
back of the book provides key
information in useful tables.

How the English
Vocabulary Builder works
Sports equipment and venues
EQUIPMENT

Practice exercises
Students get the chance to
practice all the vocabulary
that appears in the book.
MATCH THE WORDS TO THE CORRECT PICTURES

FILL IN THE GAPS, PUTTING THE WORDS FROM THE
PANEL INTO THE CORRECT CATEGORIES

VENUES

EQUIPMENT

LOOK AT THE PICTURE AND
WRITE THE CORRECT WORD FOR
EACH LABEL

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO AND
CIRCLE THE WORDS YOU HEAR

REWRITE THE WORDS, CORRECTING THE SPELLINGS

Illustrations
English words are put into
a visual context, making
them easy to remember.

18

Audio support
The audio recordings help
students to pronounce
spoken English vocabulary.

VENUES

TEACHING
ADVICE AND
ACTIVITIES

Grammar
English for Everyone introduces new grammar to your students in easy-tounderstand stages, and provides a simple explanation and a breakdown of
how to form each structure. This step-by-step teaching method will help
your students to understand new grammar and use it with confidence.

GENERAL ADVICE TEACHING GRAMMAR TO YOUR STUDENTS
INTRODUCE KEY LANGUAGE
1 Each Key Language box in English for Everyone introduces
new grammar with an example sentence and illustration.
Make sure your class is familiar with the vocabulary in the
example, then ask a student to describe what they can see.

HOW TO BUILD A NEW SENTENCE
1 The How to Form boxes break English grammar
down into its simplest parts and provide students with
a formation guide that they can refer back to later. The
annotations use simple language to explain how to form
the construction.

KEY LANGUAGE THE PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS
The present perfect continuous describes an activity that took place over a period
of time in the recent past. The activity might just have stopped or might still be happening.
PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

HOW TO FORM THE PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS
The past activity
often affects the
present moment.

SUBJECT

“HAS / HAVE”

“BEEN”

Use “have” or “has,”
depending on the subject.

2 Write the example sentence on the board. Ask your
students a few questions to check they understand how the
structure is used (e.g. “When did she start painting the
house? Has she finished?”).
3 Play the accompanying audio and ask your class to repeat
the example sentence together. Then ask
individual students to repeat the
sentence, paying attention to stress
and pronunciation.
ASK YOUR STUDENTS TO GIVE FURTHER EXAMPLES
1 At the start of your class, ask your students a few
questions. For example, if teaching the present perfect
continuous, ask your students how long they have been
learning English. Keep a note of what your students tell you.
2 Having introduced the Key Language, draw your
students’ attention to the Further Examples box. Use any
pictures to explore the grammar point, and play the audio.
3 Using the answers your students gave
you at the start of the class, write a new
example about one of your students. Then
ask the students to give you some more
examples using the target grammar.

20

VERB + “-ING”

“Been” stays the
same for all subjects.

OBJECT

Add “-ing” to
the main verb.

2 Copy the jigsaw labels from the How to Form box onto
the board. Ask your students which words in the examples
belong under which label in the jigsaw and write them
below each heading.
3 You can copy the How to Form box onto
a large piece of paper and stick it to the
classroom wall so that your students can refer
to it at future points in the course.
MAKE THE MOST OF THE BOARD
1 Think of different ways you can depict grammar
on the board. You don’t need to be an amazing artist to
draw simple pictures.
2 If you’re teaching a lesson about the present continuous
for future arrangements, you might draw simple images of
someone eating at a restaurant or watching a movie.
3 If you’re introducing a new verb tense, you can draw
a timeline. Draw an arrow on the board to represent
time. Then add information using
different colored markers to identify
different tenses.
4 Encourage your students to
come up to the board and write
their own examples.

GENERAL ADVICE TEACHING GRAMMAR TO YOUR STUDENTS continued
FOLLOW THE COLOR SCHEME
1 The Key Language boxes in English for Everyone often
use different colors for the different parts of speech in
the sample sentences. When you write down your
own examples, follow the same color scheme as in
the sample sentences.
KEY LANGUAGE COMPARATIVE ADJECTIVES
For most adjectives
with one or two
syllables, add “-er”
to make the
comparative.
Add “-er” to make
the comparative.

Use “than” after the
comparative adjective.

2 If you are teaching comparatives, for example, you
might write a sentence about two of the students in your
class (e.g. “Juan Pablo is older than
Tomás”) following the same color
scheme as in the example above.
3 If you don’t have access to colored
markers or chalk, you can mark each
part of speech with a different letter
or number.

USE REAL-LIFE MATERIALS
1 Bring in photos and pictures that will help you to
explore the target grammar. For example, if you’re
teaching comparatives, bring in pictures of cars, rivers, or
cities that students can easily compare.
2 Find real-life examples of grammar in use in newspapers
and magazines. Make copies for your class and ask your
students to identify the examples of the grammar.
3 Use short video clips that include examples of the
new grammar. Ask your students to
note down the examples, before
giving them an audio script to
check their answers.
ANOTHER WAY TO SAY
1 The course books also include modules dedicated to
some of the different ways you can use the same
construction in English. You can copy these onto large
pieces of paper and stick them to the classroom walls.
ANOTHER WAY TO SAY THE ZERO CONDITIONAL
Sentences using the zero conditional can be
reversed, so the result comes before the action.

COMMON MISTAKES
1 The course books include modules dedicated to
some of the mistakes that your students are likely to
make when speaking or writing. You can copy this
information onto large pieces of paper and stick them
to the classroom walls for easy reference.
COMMON MISTAKES STATE VERBS

The result can come at the
beginning of the sentence.

Use a comma if the action comes first.

“If ” or “when” can sit between the action
and result, without a comma.

2 These modules make use of color to represent the
different parts of the sentence. When you’re writing further
examples on the board, use the same color scheme.

It is incorrect to use state verbs in the continuous form.

You can usually only use
state verbs in the simple form.

You can’t usually use state verbs
in the continuous form.

2 Keep a notebook so that you can write down the
mistakes that your students often make. You can use
these notes as the basis of a grammar review lesson.
3 Set aside a dedicated correction slot in class.
Rather than interrupt your students when
they are in the middle of a speaking
activity, return to their mistakes at a fixed
point later in the class.

KEEP DRILLING
1 Make sure you drill each stage of the grammar
presentation when teaching a new grammar point to
your students. Always ask your students to repeat
(either individually or as a class) the example sentences
you write on the board.
2 You can make the drill more personal to each student
by allowing them to change some of the words. For example,
if teaching the present perfect continuous, you might
drill: “I’ve been learning English for…,” with each student
finishing the sentence in their own way.
3 The practice books include many
opportunities for your students to practice
the new grammar, and can be used either
in class or at home.

21

GRAMMAR EXERCISE CHOOSING THE CORRECT WORD OR SENTENCE
In these exercises, the task is to cross out incorrect words in a
sentence, or to mark the correct sentence from two alternatives.
The incorrect words or sentences contain grammatical mistakes.
Exercise type icon

Tick boxes:
Students mark each
sentence that is correct.

MARK THE SENTENCES THAT ARE CORRECT
CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT WORDS IN THE SENTENCES

Choice of words:
The words to choose
between are in colored text.

Incorrect sentence: The incorrect
sentence contains a grammatical mistake.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
ADAPT A PASSAGE OF TEXT

CHOOSE THE CORRECT SENTENCE

Put your students into pairs. Give each pair a set of
10 index cards. Each card should have two versions of the
same sentence written on it. One version of the sentence
should be correct, and the other should contain a
grammar mistake.

◼

◼ The

pair of students should then decide which version
of the sentence is correct on each card, marking the
correct sentence with a tick.

◼ As

you go through the answers, ask
stronger students to explain why the
sentences are right or wrong.

Find a short text that includes five or more examples of
grammar that you have been teaching. You can use a
newspaper or magazine article or an English for Everyone
reading comprehension text.

◼

◼ Retype

the text onto a worksheet, including a grammar
mistake alongside each example of the target language.
For example, “The police look / are looking for the thief.”

◼ Ask

your students to read the text and cross out
the incorrect words. Then ask
students to explain why the incorrect
words are wrong.
HOMEWORK: STUDENTS’ MISTAKES

MATCH THE RULE TO THE MISTAKE

Prepare a set of five index cards. Write a grammar rule
in simple language on each card. For example, “State
verbs are not normally used in continuous forms.”

◼

Prepare a second set of five cards. Write a sentence on
each card that contains a grammar mistake that results
from breaking a rule on one of the cards from the first
set. For example, “I am liking pizza.”

◼

Divide your class into groups and give
both sets of cards to each group. The
students match each card with an incorrect
sentence to a card with a grammar rule.

◼

22

Choose 10 of the most common grammatical mistakes
that your students make.

◼

Prepare a worksheet with 10 sentences. Each sentence
should include a correct option and an incorrect option.
The incorrect option should be typical of one of your
students’ common mistakes. For example, “My uncle
live / lives in a villa in Lisbon.”

◼

Ask your students to read the sentences at
home and cross out the incorrect words in
each sentence.

◼

GRAMMAR EXERCISE CORRECTING ERRORS
In these exercises, students read sentences, or
highlighted phrases in a passage of text, that contain
grammatical errors. They must rewrite the sentences
or phrases with the errors corrected.
Exercise
type icon

REWRITE THE HIGHLIGHTED
PHRASES, CORRECTING ERRORSS

Highlighted errors:
The mistakes in the
text are highlighted.

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, CORRECTING THE ERRORS

Corrected sentence:
Students rewrite the entire sentence
with the error corrected.

Corrections:
Students write the
correct version of the
highlighted phrase.

Errors: Each of these sentences
contains a grammatical mistake.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
STICK SENTENCES TO THE WALL

Take an exercise where students have to rewrite
incorrect sentences with the errors corrected. Copy the
incorrect sentences onto construction paper and stick
each one to a different location around the classroom.

◼

◼ Ask your students to walk around the

classroom and read the incorrect sentences.
They should then write corrected versions
of the sentences in their exercise books.
CLASSROOM COMPETITION

TIC-TAC-TOE

Draw a grid of nine squares on the board. Write a short
sentence or phrase containing a grammatical mistake in
each square of the grid.

◼

Divide your class into two teams—the “Xs” and the “Os.”
The teams take turns correcting one of the sentences or
phrases from the grid. If a team
successfully corrects a sentence or
phrase, they can draw their team symbol
(a 0 or a X) on the square. The first team
to get three squares in a row wins.

◼

Prepare 10 sentences. Each sentence should contain a
grammatical mistake. Divide your class into two teams.

◼

HOMEWORK: CORRECT THE MISTAKES

Find a short text that includes grammar you have been
teaching. This could be a newspaper or magazine article,
or an English for Everyone reading comprehension text.

◼

◼

If they answer correctly, they win a point. If not, the
other team has a chance to correct the
sentence and win the point instead.

◼

Write a sentence on the board and ask the first team to
correct the error in the sentence.

◼

Repeat the process with the other
sentences. The team with the most
points wins.

◼

Rewrite the text, introducing five grammatical mistakes.

At home, your students should read the
text, find the sentences with the errors in
them, and rewrite those sentences with
the errors corrected.

◼

23

GRAMMAR EXERCISE FILLING IN THE GAPS
Many of the English for Everyone
grammar exercises involve filling
in gaps in sentences. The words
to fill into the gaps are sometimes
given in a word panel, and
sometimes mentioned in the
exercise instruction.

Exercise type icon
FILL IN THE GAPS USING
THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

Instruction: The two possible
phrases that students can use to
fill in the gaps may be mentioned
in the exercise instruction.
FILL IN THE GAPS USING “HOW MUCH”
AND “HOW MANY”

Gaps: Students write the
missing word in each
sentence on a colored line.

Word panel: The correct words to
fill into the gaps may be given in a
panel below the sentences.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
FIND YOUR PARTNER

Find an exercise that involves filling in gaps in sentences
using words or phrases in a panel. Copy each sentence
with a gap to fill in onto a separate card. Then copy each
word or phrase from the panel onto a separate card.

◼

Distribute the cards among your students.
They should walk around the classroom asking
other students what is written on their card
until they find their partner. For example, a
student with a gap-fill sentence should find
the student whose word fits into the gap.

◼

STICK THE WORDS TO THE BOARD

Choose a gap-fill exercise with a word panel and
write the questions on the board, leaving a gap to fill
in for each sentence.

◼

Write each word from the panel on a separate
index card. Divide your students into two teams and give
a set of cards to each team. Allow the teams to
look through their word cards.

◼

Students from each team should then
take turns to come up to the board and
stick a card in the gap in a sentence.

◼

CATEGORIES

For exercises that ask students to choose between
two possible phrases (such as “How much…” and “How
many…”), write each phrase from the instruction onto
a separate card to make a category card.

HOMEWORK: STUDENTS WRITE THEIR OWN GAP-FILL

◼

Then write each question from the exercise (for
example “… pizza is there?”) onto a separate piece of card.

◼

Divide your class into groups and give
each group a set of category and
question cards. The students then work
together to sort the question cards into
the correct categories.

◼

24

Ask your students to write five sentences at home using
grammar they have studied in a recent lesson.

◼

The students should remove words or phrases that
contain the target grammar from each sentence, leaving
a gap to fill. Then they should write the words that they
have removed in a panel below the sentences.

◼

Mark the homework to check that the
sentences are correct. Once any errors have
been corrected, the students can swap their
exercises with a partner.

◼

GRAMMAR EXERCISE FILLING IN THE GAPS WITH TENSES
In these exercises, the task is to fill in gaps in sentences using the
correct tense of the verbs in parentheses (given in their base
form). With some exercises, the instruction tells students what
tense to use, and in others, students must decide for themselves.
Exercise
type icon

Forming the tense: Students fill in
the gaps using the given verbs and
form the tense correctly.
FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE
VERBS IN THE PRESENT PERFECT

FILL IN THE GAPS BY PUTTING THE VERBS
IN THE CORRECT TENSES

Given
tense: In this
exercise, the
instruction
tells students
which tense
to use.
Verbs: The
verbs to fill
into the gaps
are given in
parentheses.

Choosing the tenses: The correct answers
need two different tenses. Students must
use the right tense and form it correctly.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
USE THE BOARD

CARD PAIRS

Prepare two sets of 15 cards. Each card in the first set
should have either a personal pronoun (e.g. “he,” “you,”
or “we”) or a name written on it. Each card in the second
set should have the base form of a verb written on it.

Write the sentences from the gap-fill exercise
on the board, but do not include the verbs in
parentheses. Instead, write each of these verbs onto
separate index cards. Leave the gap in each sentence
so that your students can write the verb in it.

◼

Ask a student to come up to the board and give them
a card. They should decide which of the gap-fill
sentences the verb goes in, and write the verb in the
gap using the correct tense.

and take a card from each set. Ask each student to write a
sentence on the board using the words from
the two cards and a tense of your choice. For
example, if you ask a student who has “I” and
“go” on their cards to use the past simple,
they could write “I went to the gym last night.”

◼

◼

Check with the class whether the
sentence is correct. Continue with the
rest of the exercise.

◼

◼ Your students should come up to the board individually

HOMEWORK ACTIVITIES
CORRECTING STUDENTS’ MISTAKES

Keep a note of some of the mistakes that your
students make with tenses in their homework tasks.

◼

Prepare a worksheet with 10 sentences based on these
mistakes. Each sentence should include a gap where you
have removed the verb. Next to each gap write the base
form of the verb in parentheses. For example, if you are
reviewing the present perfect, you could
write: “Ali
(not finish) his exercise yet.”

◼

Your students should then write the
correct form of the verb in each gap.

◼

Find a text that includes at least five examples of a
tense that you have been studying. The English for
Everyone practice books are a good source of texts that
include specific tenses.

◼

Remove each example of the tense from the text,
leaving a gap in its place. Next to the gap, write the base
form of the verb in parentheses. For example:
“We
(arrive) in London on Wednesday.”

◼

◼ Ask your students to fill in the gaps using the

correct form of the verbs. Your students can
complete this activity in class or at home.

25

GRAMMAR EXERCISE PUTTING WORDS IN THE CORRECT ORDER
Students are given
sentences where the
words have been put in a
random order. The task is
to write the sentence out
underneath the jumbled
words, with the words in
the correct order.

Exercise type icon
REWRITE THE INDIRECT QUESTIONS, PUTTING THE WORDS
IN THE CORRECT ORDER

Word boxes:
The words from
each question
are presented in
a random order.
Capital letters
and punctuation
are included.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
WORD MAZE

WORD CARDS

Create a simple grid on the board or a worksheet with
two or three rows of boxes.

◼

Write each word from the word order questions on
separate index cards. Give a set of cards to each student.

◼

◼

Ask the students to rearrange the cards with the words
in the correct order.

◼

Go around the classroom giving
feedback on any mistakes.

◼

◼

CATEGORIES

Put your students into small groups, and give them a set
of category cards with titles such as “question word,”
“subject,” and “verb.”

◼

Arrange a jumbled sentence so the following word of
the sentence is above, below, or next to the preceding
word, forming a word maze.
Ask your students to follow the word maze to find
the next word in the sentence. They should draw
a line through all the
words to show the
correct word order
in the sentence.

Students put cards with the words from
each question into the correct categories.

◼

Then students form their own sentences,
using one word from each category.

◼

HOMEWORK: CREATE YOUR OWN QUESTIONS
PRONUNCIATION: REPEAT THE AUDIO

Ask a student to say a sentence from the exercise out loud
with the words in the correct order, one word at a time.

◼

Play the supporting audio for a sentence. Then ask a
student to repeat the full sentence out loud.

◼

◼
◼

Make sure your student stresses the words in
each sentence that are most important for
communicating its meaning.

◼

26

Ask your students to write three sentences at home
with the words rearranged in a random order.

◼

Check that their sentences are correct when you mark
the homework.
Once any errors have been corrected, ask
students to write their word order questions
on the board. The rest of the class should
put the words in the correct order.

GRAMMAR EXERCISE WRITING A SENTENCE ANOTHER WAY
In this task, students are given a
correct sentence and asked to write
another correct sentence, or given
two sentences to rewrite as one.
The new sentence must have the
same meaning as the original
sentence, but be worded differently.

Exercise type icon
REWRITE THE SENTENCES, REVERSING THE ORDER OF THE PHRASES

Instruction:
The instruction
tells students
how to rewrite
the sentence.

REWRITE THE SENTENCES, JOINING THEM WITH THE GIVEN
EXPRESSION OF PURPOSE

Rewriting one sentence: Some
exercises involve rewriting one correct
sentence using target language.
Rewriting two sentences: In other
exercises, students use target language
to join two correct sentences together.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
SENTENCE MATCH

WORD AFTER WORD

◼ Prepare

a set of sentences. Each sentence has two
versions, A and B, which should mean the same thing,
but use different wording.

◼

◼

Write version A and version B of each sentence onto
separate cards. Give each of your students a card.

◼

The students walk around the classroom asking other
students what is on their card until they find their partner
who has the matching card.

◼

◼

When all the students have found a
partner, check that they have found the
correct partner. Then collect the cards and
distribute them again.

◼

Write a sentence on the board. Make sure it
includes an example of some of the new language
students have studied in recent lessons.
Go around the class. Each student has to change
one word in the sentence. Write each new sentence
on the board if it is correct.
Continue around the class until no
student is able to offer an alternative
word. The students can then vote for
their favorite sentence.

HOMEWORK: IMPROVE THE PASSAGE
KEY WORDS
◼

Write two short sentences on the board.

Prepare a set of cards with key linking words or
expressions, such as “although,” “in spite of,” or “but.”
Give each student one of the cards.

◼

Ask individual students to come up to the board and
rewrite the two sentences as one sentence,
using the expression on their card to
connect them. The other students can
decide if they think the sentence is correct.

◼

Prepare a short piece of text. It shouldn’t include any
errors, but should be very repetitive. Your students
should improve the text by using target language to vary
some of the sentences.

◼

At home, students prepare improved versions of the
text. At the beginning of the following class, students can
read out their new versions.

◼

If you want to make this activity easier,
give students a list of expressions that they
should add to the text.

◼

27

GRAMMAR EXERCISE SORTING WORDS INTO CATEGORIES
In these exercises, students sort words such as adjectives
and adverbs into categories. Understanding what category
these words come under helps students to use them
without making grammatical mistakes.
Exercise
type icon

WRITE THE WORDS FROM THE PANEL UNDER THE CORRECT GROUPS

OPINION

SIZE

SHAPE

AGE

Sorting into categories: Students write each word
under the correct category group heading.

COLOR

Categories: Box
headings for each
group show the
different categories
to sort words into.

Word panel: The words
to sort into categories
are given in a panel
below the boxes for the
category groups.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
STICK TO THE BOARD

Copy each word from the panel in the exercise onto
separate index cards. If you have a large class, you might
want to add some more words of your own. Write each
category group heading at the top of the board.

◼

Divide your class into two teams and give a set of cards
to each team. The students from each team should take
turns to come up to the board and stick a word under the
correct category group heading.

◼

Once all the words have been stuck
under the correct heading, ask
individual students to say a sentence
using two of the words on the board.
Make sure you correct any errors.

◼

EXPLORE THE CLASSROOM

Copy each word from the panel onto separate index
cards. Stick the cards to the classroom walls.

◼

Divide your class into small groups and tell each group
to look for words that come under a different category.
For example, if you are teaching adjectives, one group
could look for opinion adjectives and another group
could look for adjectives to describe size.

◼

Each group should walk around the classroom
and write down all of the words that belong in
their category.

◼

BRAINSTORMING

Put your students into teams. Give each team one of
the categories from the exercise. (These can be taken
from the category group headings.)

HOMEWORK: WRITE A STORY

◼

The teams should have 5 minutes to think of as many
examples as they can of words that fall under their category.

◼

Write your students’ ideas on the board. Each team
should then write five sentences using
the words on the board. Go around
the classroom checking that the
sentences are grammatically correct.

◼

28

Give each student a selection of five words from the
categories exercise. Ask them to write a short story that
includes their five words.

◼

The students can then present their stories to the other
members of the class at the beginning of the
next lesson.

◼

When you mark the homework, pay
attention to any grammatical errors such
as incorrect adjective order.

◼

GRAMMAR EXERCISE MATCHING BEGINNINGS AND ENDINGS OF SENTENCES
In these exercises, students draw a line between the
beginning of a sentence on the left-hand side of
the exercise, and the ending of a sentence on the
right-hand side. The task is to construct sentences
that make sense and are grammatically correct.
Exercise
type icon

Matching exercise: Students draw
a line linking the beginning of each
sentence with its correct ending.

MATCH THE BEGINNINGS OF THE SENTENCES TO THE CORRECT ENDINGS

Endings of
sentences: The
endings of the
sentences are
presented in a
random order.

Target grammar: One half of the sentence usually
includes target grammar that will help students
decide what the other half of the sentence could be.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
MATCH THE PAPERS

Write the beginning and ending of each sentence from
the exercise onto separate index cards. Repeat until you
have a set of cards for each of your students.

PREDICT THE ENDINGS

◼ Give each of your students a set of cards to lay out on the

This activity is suitable as a warm-up before students
complete the exercise. Ask them to close their books.
Then play the supporting audio for the first half of one of
the sentences from the exercise.

desk in front of them.

◼

Ask them to make grammatically correct
sentences with the cards by placing the
them on the desk so that the beginning
of each sentence is matched with its
correct ending.

◼

◼

◼

◼

Pause the audio and ask individual students to predict
the second half of the sentence. Encourage your students
to be imaginative.
Repeat with the remaining sentences
in the exercise.

FIND A PARTNER
HOMEWORK: ADAPT A REAL-LIFE TEXT

Get some index cards. Write one half of each sentence
onto one card, and the other half onto another one. Give
one card to each of your students.

◼

The students walk around the classroom asking other
students what is on their paper until they find their partner
who has the other half of the sentence.

◼

◼

◼

When all the students have found a
partner, check that they have found the
correct partner. Then collect the cards
and distribute them again.

◼

Retype a newspaper or magazine article onto a
worksheet for each of your students. Remove the second
half of five of the sentences from the article, leaving a gap.
Type the halves of the sentences that you have
removed at the bottom of the worksheet in a
random order.
At home, your students read the text and
rewrite the missing halves of the sentences
in the correct place.

◼

29

GRAMMAR EXERCISE UNDERSTANDING TARGET GRAMMAR
Many English grammar forms can be used in different
ways and have different meanings. In these exercises,
students read sentences that all include a similar
grammatical structure and decide how the structure
is being used in each sentence.

Exercise type icon
MARK WHETHER EACH SENTENCE IS A PREDICTION, OFFER,
PROMISE, OR DECISION

Uses of target grammar:
The sentences show the various ways in
which target grammar can be used. Students
mark the correct meaning of each sentence.

Prediction

Offer

Promise

Decision

Prediction

Offer

Promise

Decision

Prediction

Offer

Promise

Decision

MARK WHETHER THE STATEMENTS REFER TO PAST OR FUTURE ABILITY

These exercises
are only suitable
for students at
intermediate level
or above.

Past

Future

Past

Future

Past

Future

Past

Future

Past

Future

Past

Future

Target grammar:
All the sentences include the
same target grammar, in this
case the future with “will.”

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
SENTENCES AND CATEGORIES

Write each of the sentences from the exercise onto
a set of individual cards. Then prepare a set of category
cards for each possible use of the grammar in the
sentences. For example, if you are teaching the different
uses of the future with “will,” prepare separate cards
with “prediction,” “offer,” “promise,” and “decision”
written on each card.

◼

Divide your class into small groups. Give
each group a set of sentence and category
cards. The students have to place each
sentence card under the correct category.

◼

USE THE AUDIO

Write the grammatical form and the different possible
ways in which it can be used on the board.

◼

Play each sentence from the supporting audio for the
exercise in a random order. Stop after each sentence
and ask a student to explain how the grammar is being
used. For example, if the sentence is, “You could be
the manager of your department,” the
student should say that the sentence is
talking about the future, not the past.

◼

Ask the student to repeat the sentence,
making sure they stress the correct words.

◼

HOMEWORK: CHOOSE THE CORRECT MEANING

STICK SENTENCES AROUND THE CLASSROOM

Write each of the sentences from the exercise onto
separate cards. Prepare a worksheet for each student
with headings to indicate each possible use of the
grammar in the sentences (such as “prediction,” “offer,”
“promise,” or “decision”).

◼

Stick the sentence cards to different locations around
the classroom and give each student a
worksheet. The students should then
walk around the classroom reading the
sentences and writing them under the
correct heading on the worksheet.

◼

30

Find 10 real-life examples of the target grammar.
You could use newspapers or magazine articles, search
for a suitable text online, or find an English for Everyone
reading comprehension text.

◼

Prepare a worksheet for your students. Write the
10 sentences with examples of the target grammar that
you have found. Then write the different
possible ways in which the grammar can be
used below each sentence. The students
should select the correct description of the
grammar used in each sentence.

◼

GRAMMAR EXERCISE CHOOSING THE BEST SENTENCE
In these exercises, students read a
question, statement, or greeting,
and decide which of two possible
responses is most appropriate. The
exercises help students become
more familiar with formal and
informal English.

Exercise type icon
MARK THE BEST REPLY
TO EACH REQUEST
All of these replies are correct, but some are more
appropriate for formal or informal situations.

Formal and informal: Some
of these sentences are formal,
while others are informal.

Best answer:
If the question on the left-hand side
of the exercise is informal, students
should mark the least formal of the
two options for a response.

Wrong register:
The incorrect option is not
grammatically wrong. It is too formal
or (in this case) too informal or rude.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
USE THE AUDIO

Give your students about 5 minutes to complete
the exercise individually.

◼

Then use the audio to go through the answers with
the whole class. Play the first part of the audio for each
question (e.g. “Can I borrow your car, Harry?”) to the
class, then pause it. Ask a student to respond to the audio
with the answer that he or she has marked
(e.g. “No, you can’t, Joe. I need it today.”).

◼

Play the rest of the audio and compare it
with the student’s answer. Give feedback on
any mistakes.

◼

A VERY FORMAL REQUEST

Prepare five very simple sentences that involve requests,
such as, “Lend me some money!” or “Open the window!”
Write each sentence onto separate index cards.

◼

Put your students into groups of three or four. Give each
group a card and ask them to make the request on the card
as formal and polite as possible. For example, “Lend me
some money!” might become, “I was wondering if you
could lend me some money.”

◼

The students should say their polite
request to a student from another team,
who should respond appropriately.

◼

ROLE PLAYS

Prepare a set of cards for your class. Half the
cards should describe a situation in which your students
might need to use formal English (such as a job
interview), and the other half should describe a situation
where they would use informal English (such as meeting
a friend or acquaintance).

◼

HOMEWORK: FORMAL OR INFORMAL?

Prepare a set of 10 mini-dialogues using the language
from the exercise. Half of them should include examples
of informal language, and the other half should use more
formal language. Write the mini-dialogues onto a
worksheet for each student.

◼

At home your students should decide whether the
dialogues are formal or informal. They should also
underline all the examples of formal or informal
language in the dialogues to justify their decision.

◼

Put your students into pairs. Give each pair one of
the cards describing a formal situation, and one card
describing an informal situation. Ask them to prepare
a short role play for each situation.

◼ After you have gone through their answers

After about 10 minutes, ask each pair to
come up to the front of the class and perform
their two role plays.

at the beginning of the following class,
ask your students to perform the
mini-dialogues in pairs.

◼

◼

31

GRAMMAR EXERCISE EVERYDAY ENGLISH
Many of the exercises in English for Everyone help students
practice useful words and phrases for everyday, real-life situations,
such as talking about the weather or ordering food in a restaurant.

Useful phrases:
The gap-fill sentences here
are based on phrases that
students might encounter
in everyday life.

Exercise type icon
You will find
these exercises in units
where the “New Language”
practice point isn’t a grammar
rule, but an everyday English
topic, such as “health
complaints” or “weather
descriptions.”

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

Useful vocabulary: The words in the
panel are examples of useful vocabulary
on a topic, in this case, the weather.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
USE THE BOARD

This activity is suitable for exercises with gap-fill
sentences. Write each sentence from the exercise
on the board, leaving the gap to fill.

◼

Write each of the words from the panel on separate
cards. Repeat so that you have two sets of cards. Divide
your students into two teams and give a set of cards to
each team. Give the teams a couple of minutes to look
through the word cards and sentences.

◼

One member of each team should
then come up to the board and stick a
card in the gap in the first sentence.
Give feedback, then continue with the
second sentence.

◼

ROLE PLAY SCENARIOS

Choose five scenarios that are relevant to the topic
of the lesson. For example, if you are teaching shopping
vocabulary, one scenario might involve someone taking
a faulty item back to a store.

◼

Review any grammar or vocabulary (e.g. ways of
complaining) that you want your students to include in
their role plays and write it on the board.

◼

Put your students into pairs and give each pair
a scenario. After about 10 minutes, ask
each pair to perform their role play in front
of the rest of the class.

◼

HOMEWORK: BRAINSTORMING

SPEAKING FOLLOW-UP

Choose an exercise with supporting audio. Play one
of the sentences to a student in your class.

◼

The student should respond to the sentence in an
appropriate way. For example, if you play the audio
for, “The weather’s beautiful. It’s hot and sunny,”
your student might reply, “Great! Let’s go to
the beach.”

◼

◼

Continue around the class, playing each
remaining sentence to a student and asking
them to respond.

◼

32

At home, ask your students to write down as many
words or phrases as they can on the topic of the lesson.
For example, if you are teaching weather, your students
could brainstorm adjectives to describe the weather.

◼

In the next class, use the vocabulary that your
students have found as the basis for a class discussion.
With weather vocabulary, you could ask
your students to compare the weather in
their country with that in other countries.

GRAMMAR EXERCISE BUSINESS ENGLISH
The Business English for Everyone course contains a wide range
of exercises to help students practice phrases and constructions
that are particularly useful for common business scenarios.
Exercise
type icon

MARK THE SENTENCES THAT
ARE CORRECT

MARK THE BEST REPLY TO
EACH STATEMENT

Sample answer:
In this exercise,
students mark the
correct response to
each statement.

Useful phrases:
The statements
and correct
responses here
use language that
students would
encounter in
the workplace.

Useful phrases:
In this exercise, the correct
answers are all useful phrases
for welcoming visitors.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
USE THE AUDIO
◼ This activity is suitable for exercises that involve marking

the best reply to a statement, question, or greeting. Give
your students 5 minutes to complete the exercise.
Then use the audio to go through the answers. Play the
first part of the audio for each question (e.g. “Could I
speak to Jia Li, please?”) to the class, then
pause it. Ask a student to respond to the audio
with the answer that they have marked, then
play the rest of the audio and compare it with
their answer. Give feedback on any mistakes.

◼

PROBLEM SOLVING

Choose five scenarios that your students might
encounter at work. For example, they might have to
decide which job candidate to employ. Write each scenario
on a card together with three suggested solutions.

◼

Review any target language (e.g. ways of agreeing or
disagreeing) that you want your students to use during
the task. Then put your students into pairs
and give each pair a scenario. They should
discuss their scenario for 10 minutes,
before choosing the best solution.

◼

PERSONALIZE THE EXERCISE

If you have a group of students who work in similar
jobs, you can create exercises that are particularly
relevant to their needs.

◼

For example, if your students all work in a hotel and you
are teaching formal telephone language, you can prepare
an exercise that includes the kind of language they might
have to use with customers.

◼

Write 10 pairs of sentences. One sentence
in each pair should be correct, and the other
should include a mistake. Ask your students
to mark the correct sentence in each pair.

◼

HOMEWORK: REAL-LIFE TEXTS

There are many examples of real-life business English
texts and recordings that you can use in homework tasks.

◼

Find two short business reports in a newspaper or
online. Give half the class one report, and half the class
the other, to read at home. At the beginning of the next
lesson, each student should present a summary of their
report to a partner who has read the other report.

◼

You can ask higher-level students to find
their own business report. They should then
present their report to the rest of the class at
the beginning of the following lesson.

◼

33

Vocabulary
English for Everyone teaches the most common and
useful English words and phrases. The series introduces
and practices new vocabulary with the use of illustrations,
definitions, and short passages of writing.

GENERAL ADVICE TEACHING VOCABULARY TO YOUR STUDENTS
TEACH IN CONTEXT
1 Your students are more likely to remember new
vocabulary if you introduce it in a real-life context.
2 If you are teaching fruit and vegetables, for example,
begin by asking your students to guess what you bought
from the supermarket last night. Your students’ suggestions
will provide you with a starting point for exploring new
words on the topic.

CONSIDER YOUR STUDENTS’ NEEDS
1 Where and when do your students need to use
English? Make sure you are teaching the kind of
vocabulary that is most relevant to their requirements.
2 Will your students have to use the new vocabulary
themselves or just recognize it? If they have to use it, try
to include it in speaking and writing activities.

3 Bring in real-life examples of the target
vocabulary, such as a bag of groceries if you
are teaching food vocabulary.

3 If they use English at work, make sure
your classes include workplace vocabulary. If
they talk to native speakers, include informal
and idiomatic English in your lessons.

CATEGORIES
1 Sorting new vocabulary into categories will help your
students learn it. Ask them to keep a notebook in which
they can write and organize their vocabulary.

WORD FORMS
1 When you teach new vocabulary, don’t forget to
explore its grammar. What kind of word are you introducing?
Is it a noun or adjective; is it countable or uncountable?

2 Ranking and ordering new words will also help your
students remember them. For example, ask them to order
forms of transportation from the slowest to the fastest.

2 Teaching a new word in a sample sentence will help
you to show what part of speech the word belongs to.

3 Ask your students to find more examples
from a particular category online as
homework. They can share this vocabulary
with the other students in the class.
YOUR STUDENTS’ NATIVE LANGUAGE
1 Some words in English may be similar to their equivalents
in your students’ native language. This will make the English
words easier for your students to recognize and remember.
2 Make sure you drill the spelling and pronunciation
of these words, however. It is likely to be slightly different
in your students’ native language.
3 Be careful that your students do not use
“false friends:” words that might look similar
in the students’ language and English, but
have different meanings.

34

3 Words that are difficult to spell or pronounce are
often difficult to remember. Play the
supporting audio and ask your students to
repeat each word, or to write the words out
so that you can check the spelling.
DRILLING AND PRACTICING
1 Your students will need to keep using new vocabulary
or they are likely to forget it. Give them a short list of words
to learn at home at the end of each lesson, and test them
on the words at the beginning of the next lesson.
2 Keep a note of any vocabulary that causes students
problems, and include it in tests and review exercises.
3 Encourage your higher-level students to
read English newspapers and magazines at
home. These are an excellent source of
idiomatic words and expressions.

VOCABULARY EXERCISE WRITING THE CORRECT WORD FOR A PICTURE
The English for Everyone
practice books include practice
exercises for each corresponding
vocabulary teaching module in
the course books.

Exercise type icon
FOOD AND DRINK WRITE THE WORDS FROM THE PANEL UNDER
THE CORRECT PICTURES

Writing words:
The task is to write
the correct word
underneath the picture.

Pictures:
The pictures
in these
vocabulary
exercises are
also used in
the vocabulary
teaching
modules.

Word panel:
The words for the
pictures are presented in a
panel in a random order.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
SPEAKING: MEMORY GAMES

WORD MAP

Put your students into small groups. Give each group
a large piece of paper and explain that they are going
to draw a word map based around the target vocabulary.

◼

In the center of the board, write in large letters the
theme of the lesson (for example, “food”). Circle the
word, then draw lines coming from it that lead to other
categories (such as “meat,” “vegetables,” or “dairy” if the
topic is food). Ask for examples
of each category.

◼

The groups of students should
then make their own word
maps, adding as many words
as they can to each category.

If you are teaching food, start by saying, “I went to
the market and bought some apples.” Each student has
to then add one more item to the list, repeating all the
items mentioned by other students.

◼

You can adapt this activity to suit
other categories. For example, if the
topic is animals, you could say, “I went
to the zoo and saw an elephant.”

◼

◼

VOCABULARY BOX
◼ Keep a note of any interesting or problematic vocabulary

that students encounter in the lesson. Write the words
on slips of paper, and then put the slips in a box.
At the start of each lesson, choose a
random word from the box and ask a
student to read it out and define it.

◼

COMPETITIVE BRAINSTORMING

Put your students into teams. Give the teams a set
amount of time to think of examples of vocabulary for
a particular topic. For example, ask them to write down
as many sports as they can think of in 1 minute.

◼

With higher-level students, you can make the activity
more challenging. For example, ask
them to think of as many different
types of fruit beginning with the letter
“C” as they can in 30 seconds.

◼

HOMEWORK: LEARN AND TEST

Ask your students to learn all the vocabulary from
the teaching module at home.

◼

At the beginning of the next class, describe
one of the items of vocabulary. If a student
correctly identifies the word, they should
then describe a different item of vocabulary.

◼

35

VOCABULARY EXERCISE WRITING THE CORRECT EXPRESSION
The English for Everyone
Levels 3 and 4 practice books
offer many opportunities for
practicing useful English
expressions. Students are
given a word panel with
expressions and should write
the correct expression under
its definition above.

Illustrations: In some exercises,
visual clues are given to help
students understand the
meaning of the expressions.

Exercise type icon

FAMILY AND RELATIONSHIPS WRITE THE PHRASES FROM THE
PANEL UNDER THE CORRECT DEFINITIONS

Definitions: Each of these
phrases is a definition of one
of the expressions in the
word panel.
Expressions: The expressions
that students should match
to each definition are given
in a word panel at the
bottom of the page.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
DEFINITION BINGO

MATCHING PAIRS

Make a card for each of your students with five of the
definitions from the exercise written onto it. No two
cards should have the same five definitions on them.

◼

Write each expression and each definition from the
exercise onto separate index cards. Depending on the
number of students, repeat as necessary.

◼

Divide your students into pairs. Give each pair a set of
cards to lay out face down on the table in front of them.

◼

◼

One student turns over two cards. If they include
an expression and definition that match, the student
wins them. If not, the student places them
back on the desk face down.

◼

Play the supporting audio for the expressions in a
random order. If a student hears an expression that
matches one of the definitions on their card, they
should cross that definition out. The first student to
have crossed out all the definitions on their card should
shout out “Bingo!”

◼ The other student turns over two cards.

Repeat until all the pairs are won.
HOMEWORK: WRITE A STORY
CHARADES

Put your students into pairs and give each pair an index
card with an expression from the vocabulary exercise
written on it.
◼ Each pair acts out the expression without
using any words. The rest of the class
guesses what the expression is.

◼

36

Give each student one of the expressions from the
exercise. Ask your students to write a short story at home
that includes the expression you have given them.

◼

The students can present their stories at
the beginning of the following lesson. The
rest of the class can vote for the most
entertaining story.

◼

VOCABULARY EXERCISE MATCHING WORDS OR SENTENCES TO PICTURES
English for Everyone includes
several exercises at all levels
of the course that involve
matching vocabulary to
pictures. The task is to look
at a picture and draw a line
from the picture to the word
or sentence that matches it.

Exercise
type icon

Pictures: Students must decide
which of the sentences best
matches each picture.

PIC TURES
MATCH THE S
RD
O
W
TO THE

TIP

MATC
H
THE C THE PIC
TU
ORRE
C T S E R E S TO
N T EN
CE S

You can photocopy
illustrations from
exercises, cut them
out, and stick them
onto index cards.

Vocabulary: Students draw
a line between each picture
on the left-hand side, and
the word that matches it on
the right-hand side.
Vocabulary in context:
The vocabulary, in this case
idioms, is shown in a sentence.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
SNAP
◼ Copy each picture and word from the matching exercise

onto separate index cards. Depending on the number of
students, repeat as necessary.

GUESS THE PICTURE

Find pictures from magazines that show words from
the same category as the target vocabulary. Cut them out
and stick each picture on a separate index card. Divide
your students into pairs and give four cards to each pair.

◼

Put your students into pairs. In each pair, give one
student a pile of picture cards, and the other a pile of word
cards. Place the piles of cards face down on the desk.

◼

The students take turns to place a card from their pile
face up on the table. The first student to
notice when the cards match and shout
“Snap!” wins the pair of cards. Continue
until one student has won all the cards.

◼

◼

◼

One student takes a card, and the other asks questions
that can only be answered with “yes” or “no” to work out
what picture is on the card. For example: “Is it a picture of
an animal?”
Each student has a maximum of one
minute to discover what is shown in his
partner’s picture.

BINGO

HOMEWORK ACTIVITIES

◼

Find an exercise with at least eight questions and make
a bingo card for each student with four pictures from the
exercise. No two cards should have the same pictures.

◼

Play the supporting audio from the exercise in a random
order. If a student hears the word for a picture on their
card, they should cross the picture out.

◼

◼

The first student to cross out all the
pictures on their card and shout
“Bingo!” wins the game.

◼

Give each student five index cards with a picture on
them. Ask your students to write five sentences or a short
paragraph at home using the vocabulary on their cards.
Ask your students to find real-life examples of
the target vocabulary. For food vocabulary, they could
find a menu or a recipe. The students can
present their real-life examples to the class
in the following lesson.

37

VOCABULARY EXERCISE CHOOSING THE CORRECT WORD OR SENTENCE
In these exercises, the task is
to cross out incorrect words in
a sentence, or to mark the
correct sentence from two
alternatives. Where words and
sentences are incorrect, it is
because the vocabulary is not
appropriate in the context.

Exercise type icon
CROSS OUT THE INCORRECT ADJECTIVE IN EACH SENTENCE

Illustrations:
Students must look at
the illustrations to decide
which word is correct.

Choice of words:
The words to
choose from are
in colored text.
Tick boxes:
Students mark
the sentence
that is correct.

MARK THE SENTENCES THAT ARE CORRECT

Incorrect sentence:
The incorrect sentence
contains a vocabulary mistake.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
WORKING WITH A PARTNER

Make a set of index cards with a correct and an incorrect
sentence on each card.

◼
◼

Divide your class into pairs and give each pair one card.

AUDIO: TRUE OR FALSE

This activity is suitable for exercises with pictures. Copy
the exercise page, cut out the pictures, and stick them
onto poster board. Show a picture board to your class.

◼

For example, if you are teaching adjectives and
clothes, you could show a picture of a long dress.

Each pair works together to decide
which sentence is correct.

◼

Rotate the cards from pair to pair.

◼

◼
◼

TIC-TAC-TOE

Prepare a worksheet with nine sentences that include
vocabulary that your students have recently learned.
Remove the vocabulary from each sentence, leaving a gap.

◼

Give a copy of the worksheet to each of your students.
Divide the students into two teams.

Then play a sentence from the supporting audio.
This should either be a true description
of the picture (“This is a long dress.”) or a
false one (“This is an old T-shirt.”).
Ask your students whether the audio is
true or false.

◼

HOMEWORK: COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS

◼

Draw a grid on the board with nine squares. In each of
the squares, write the word that you have removed from
one of the sentences on the worksheet.

◼

The teams take turns to choose a sentence from the
worksheet and a word from
the grid to go in the gap in
the sentence. Teams “win”
a square on the board for
each correct word that
they choose.

◼

38

Students’ mistakes are often based around commonly
confused words that look and sound similar, but have
different meanings. For example, students might confuse
the words “sensible” and “sensitive” if they are describing
personality traits.

◼

◼ Prepare a worksheet with five sentences. Each
sentence should include a mistake due to a commonly
confused word. For example, “My brother is
very sensible and gets upset easily.”

Ask your students to write out correct
versions of the sentences at home.

◼

VOCABULARY EXERCISE MATCHING WORDS AND DEFINITIONS
The task in these exercises is to draw a line joining a definition
to a word or phrase that matches the definition. Some exercises
also involve matching words that are strongly associated with
each other, such as jobs and workplaces.

MATCH THE JOBS TO THE
WORKPLACES

Exercise type icon
MATCH THE DEFINITIONS TO THE WORDS AND PHRASES

Matching task: Students draw a line
linking a definition on the left-hand side
with the word or phrase that matches it
on the right-hand side.

Vocabulary pairs: In this
task, students match each
job to its workplace.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
FIND A PARTNER

SPEAKING: ONE-MINUTE TOPICS

◼

Give half the students in your class cards with target
vocabulary written on them. Give the other students cards
with the corresponding definition or closely related word.

◼

The students walk around the classroom asking other
students what is on their card until they find their partner
who has the matching card.

◼ You can add words to the cards that students are

◼

When all the students have found a
partner, check that they have found the
correct partner. Then collect the cards and
distribute them again.

◼

Prepare index cards with the vocabulary written on
them. Each student has to describe the word on his or
her card without actually saying the word out loud.
banned from using in their descriptions.
For example, a student describing “police officer” could
be banned from saying “arrest,” “criminal,”
or “uniform.”

TRUE OR FALSE DEFINITIONS

Think of some unusual vocabulary on the theme of the
lesson. For example, if the theme is jobs, the vocabulary
could be “zookeeper,” “clown,” or “stunt performer.”

HOMEWORK: PREPARE FOR A TEST

◼

Give each student one example of new vocabulary.
Students look up the word in their dictionary and write
three definitions for it: one true and the
other two false.

◼

Ask individual students to read out their
word and definitions. Other students guess
the correct definition.

◼

Ask your students to review the vocabulary that they
have studied in your lesson.

◼

Prepare a test for your students to complete in the next
lesson. Each question in the test should be a definition of
one of the new words or phrases they have learned.

◼

When you set the test, ask the students to
write each word or phrase under its
definition. They should remember the new
vocabulary after reviewing it at home.

◼

39

VOCABULARY EXERCISE FILLING IN THE GAPS
Many of English for Everyone’s vocabulary exercises
involve filling in one or more missing words in a sentence.
Students should use the context of the sentence to work
out what the missing words are.

Exercise type icon

FILL IN THE GAPS TO COMPLETE THE
SENTENCES

Filling in the gaps: The
task is to write the missing
word in the sentence on
the line provided.

FILL IN THE GAPS USING THE WORDS IN THE PANEL

No word panel: In some
exercises, there is no word panel.
Word panel: Most exercises give
students a word panel with all the
words to fill in the gaps.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
STICK WORDS TO WALLS

Find a gap-fill exercise with a word panel. Copy the
sentences from the exercise onto a worksheet for each
of your students, leaving the gaps to fill in.

AUDIO: SPOT THE DIFFERENCE

As a review activity, rewrite the sentences from the
gap-fill exercise on worksheets. This time, include a
wrong word in each of the gaps. For example: “I need
to give the interviewer a résumé from my last boss.”

◼

◼

Write each word from the word panel onto separate
index cards. Stick the cards to different locations around
the classroom.

◼

◼

Give a worksheet to each of your students
and ask them to walk around the classroom
and find the words to fill in the gaps.

◼

Play the supporting audio for each
sentence. Ask the students to mark the
wrong words as they listen and replace them
with the correct words that they hear.
HOMEWORK: REAL-LIFE TEXTS

PREDICT THE WORD

Find a gap-fill exercise and write the sentences on the
board, leaving the gaps to fill in. Do not write the words
from the panel on the board.

◼

Ask your students to guess the word that is missing
from each sentence on the board.

◼

If students don’t know the missing word,
encourage them to use words they do
know to describe what the word might be.

◼

40

Find a text that includes examples of vocabulary
from recent lessons. You can use newspaper or
magazine articles, find a text on the internet, or use
an English for Everyone reading comprehension text.

◼

Retype the text onto a worksheet, leaving out words
that you would like your students to practice.
Leave a gap where you have removed the
words, and write the removed words in a
panel at the bottom of the worksheet. Ask
your students to fill in the gaps in the text
as a homework task.

◼

VOCABULARY EXERCISE SORTING WORDS INTO CATEGORIES
In these exercises, students have a list of words
in a word panel. They must rewrite the words
in a box with a category heading, putting each
word under the correct category.

Exercise type icon

Headings:
Each category has a panel
with a category heading.

TIP

WRITE THE WORDS FROM
THE PANEL IN THE
CORRECT GROUPS

POSITIVE

Sorting into categories:
Students write each word
from the panel under the
correct category group.
NEGATIVE

If an exercise only has
three or four words for each
category, add more words for
your students to sort into
categories. You can use a
dictionary or thesaurus to
help you.

Word panel: The words that
students should sort into
categories are presented in a
word panel in a random order.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
STICK TO THE BOARD

Write each word from the word panel at the bottom of
the exercise onto separate index cards. Give a card to
each of your students.

◼

Write the headings from the category groups in the
exercise (such as “POSITIVE” and “NEGATIVE”)
on the board.

◼

◼ Ask individual students to come up to the

board. Each student should stick their word
card under the correct category heading.
GUESS THE WORDS

ALPHABETICAL CATEGORIES

Give each of your students a piece of paper with the
alphabet written on it. Write a category on the board.

◼

Ask your students to try to write a word that comes
under that category beginning with each letter of the
alphabet. For example, if the topic is sports, the students
might start by writing “athletics” for “A” and “badminton”
for “B” on their worksheet.

◼

Give your students 5 minutes
to think of a word for as many
letters of the alphabet as they
can. Ask students for their ideas
and write them on the board.

◼

Put your students into two teams. Give each team a
different vocabulary category based on a topic from
recent lessons.

◼

Give each team 2 minutes to brainstorm 10 words that
fall into their category. Go around the classroom
checking that the teams’ chosen words are correct and
appropriate for their given categories.

HOMEWORK: FIVE MORE WORDS

◼

Each team nominates one member to
guess the words on the opposing team’s list.
They have 1 minute to guess the words.

◼

Ask your students to find five more examples of words
that fall into the category you have been teaching.

◼

At the beginning of the next class, write
some of your students’ words on the board,
asking for examples of how and when the
vocabulary is used.

◼

41

VOCABULARY EXERCISE CORRECTING ERRORS
This vocabulary exercise tests students’ knowledge of spelling.
The task is to read a passage of text where the highlighted words
are misspelled, and rewrite the words with their correct spellings.
READ THE POSTCARD AND CORRECT THE INCORRECTLY SPELLED WORDS

Exercise type icon

Rewritten
words: Students
should rewrite all
the highlighted
words with their
correct spellings.
Misspelled words:
Misspelled words
are highlighted
in yellow.

WORKING WITH YOUR STUDENTS
USE REAL-LIFE TEXTS

USE THE BOARD

Photocopy the exercise onto a worksheet for each of
your students. Give your students 5 minutes to read the
text. Then ask individual students to come up to the
board and write one of the highlighted words from the
exercise with the correct spelling.

◼

If you want to make the task more
challenging, you can create a version of
the exercise where the misspelled words
are not highlighted. You will need to type
out the text from the exercise.

◼

You can make your own version of this activity by
adapting a short text from a magazine or newspaper.

◼

Add a number of mistakes to the text. For example, you
can add extra letters to words (“tommorrow”), swap
vowels around (“freind”), or put a homophone in place of
the correct word (“their” instead of “there”).

◼

The students can work
individually or in pairs to spot
and correct the errors.

◼

HOMEWORK ACTIVITIES

CLASSROOM SPELLING MISTAKES

Give a copy of the worksheet to each of your students.
The students can work individually to rewrite the
sentences without the spelling mistakes.

◼

Prepare a worksheet with 10 sentences on it. Each
sentence should contain a spelling mistake that your
students commonly make.

◼

After the students have completed the task,
ask individual students to read one of the
sentences out loud. Pay attention to
pronunciation. Words that are difficult to
spell can also be difficult to pronounce.

◼

42

Ask your class to learn 10 words at home. You can
include words that many of your students regularly
misspell. Explain that you are going to have a spelling
quiz at the beginning of the following lesson.

◼

◼

In the next lesson, read the words out loud and ask the
students to write them down.
For the next homework task, ask your
students to write 10 sentences. Each
sentence should include one of the words
from the spelling quiz.

◼

VOCABULARY EXERCISE MATCHING HALVES OF SENTENCES
In these exercises, students match
beginnings of sentences to their correct
endings. This activity tests your students’
understanding of new vocabulary in the
context of a sentence.
Exercise type icon

Matching exercise: Students
should draw a line linking the
beginning of each sentence with
its correct ending